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20121129
20121207
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news 2 sunday speaker john boehner was not optimistic. >> i would say we're nowhere. period. we're nowhere. >> reporter: earlier this week house gop members rejected a proposal from the white house that included tax hikes, spending cuts and $50 billion in new stimulus. >> we've put a serious offer on the table by putting revenues up there to try to get this question resolved. but the white house has responded with virtually nothing. >> reporter: if nothing is done and the gridlock continues, about 110 billion in spending cuts and a $500 billion tax increase will automatically start to take effect in 2013. and the tax policy center estimates the average american household would ring in the new year owing about $3500 more on their taxes. republican senator lindsey graham says it's a possibility. >> i think we're going over the cliff. it's pretty clear to me they've made a political calculation. >> blaming democrats for not doing enough to meet republicans halfway. >> the president plans when it comes to entitlement reform, this quite frankly a joke. >> reporter: with little more t
speaker john boehner. the two agreed it was in foeryone's best interest to get a fiscal cliff deal sooner rather than later, both agreed to aim for one before christmas, but they also acknowledged, scott, it will be very difficult to achieve that. >> pelley: thank you, major. will the president's team find a receptive republican congress? nancy cordes is on capitol hill for us tonight. nancy. >> reporter: well, scott, one top republican aide actually told me today that he sees these talks as one-sided, that republicans have been making all the proposals, and speaker boehner said he's still waiting for a balanced offer from the white house. >> republicans are willing to att revenue on the table but it's time for the president and democrats to get serious about the spending problem that our country has. >> reporter: today on capitol hill, erskine bowles met with both sides. he's the co-chair of simpson- bowles commission that drew up a leading plan to cut the federal debt. >> i upon hopeful but i wouldn't put me in the optimistic wetegory. we have a long way to go and a very few days to get
complain the new proposal from house speaker john boehner is too vague about tax increases even as it lays out a tough package of spending cuts. for instance raising medicare's eligibility age for the first time in the program's history most likely by two years from 65 to 67 the move would not apply to americans who are close to retirement now. it would be phased in for younger workers such as maggie, a virginia health club manager who just turned 50 last month. >> i think the biggest factor for me is when are you going to retire so you lose your insurance from work and if it goes to 67 you have this two- year gap. what are you going to do? >> reporter: when medicare was created in 1966, the average life expectancy for men was 67 years, today it's 76 and women live on average to 81. one recent study by the kaiser family foundation estimated that shifting medicare eligibility from 65 to 67 would save the federal government $5.7 billion a year. 65 and 66-year-olds would pay an extra $3.7 billion a year to ensure themselves. the employers would pay billions more. >> it would finally bankrupt
to entitlement and $50 billion in infrastructure. john boehner said the proposal doesn't go far enough. >> there's a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. >> reporter: congressman eric cantor agrees. >> that offer is not a serious offer. they are asking for $1.6 trillion in tax hikes and nowhere near that number in spending reform. >> reporter: house minority leader nancy pelosi says any delay in a compromise is harmful to consumers and the market. >> the country cannot afford nor should we even think in terms of stalemate. >> reporter: pelosi is pushing gop leaders for a vote to extend middle class tax cuts. the senate has approved the extension but republicans object and instead want all of the bush era tax cuts to be extended including those covering people making over $250,000 a year. anthony? >> anna werner. thanks. for more on the consequences of the fiscal cliff we're joined by robert greenstein the founder and president of budget priorities which analyzes proposed budgets and tax policies with particular emphasis on low-income american. he's in our washington bur
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4